Anthony Wayne Recreation Area

Anthony Wayne Recreation Area, Bear Mountain

Anthony Wayne Recreation Area - Bear Mountain

Anthony Wayne Recreation Area - Bear Mountain
4.5
Natureza e vida selvagem • Parques
Sobre
Duração recomendada
mais de 3 horas
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4.5
7 avaliações
Excelente
3
Muito boa
4
Razoável
0
Ruim
0
Horrível
0

Richard L
Glen Cove, Nova York29 contribuições
Octoberfest 2019
out de 2019
Beautiful park, we went on opening weekend. Food was very tasty, but lines were very long! Still it was worth the wait!
Feita em 26 de outubro de 2019
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

Kim A
Rohnert Park, United States63 contribuições
Great hike, need a map though
out de 2019 • Casais
I would have been helpful to have a map, as there is not one posted at the trailhead, nor are there any signs other than spray painted color markers on the trees and rocks. Once we figured it out, though, it was great. The blue one definitely involves full-on rock climbing, which we love, but just be aware if that's not your forte.
Feita em 4 de outubro de 2019
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

Lolly’s Look
Nova York, Nova York12.674 contribuições
Bear mountain
out de 2017
The Anthony Wayne Recreation Area offers beautiful hiking paths that allow you to experience nature in New York. We hiked during the Fall Foliage and it is our favorite time of the year here.
Feita em 21 de junho de 2018
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

Bob F
Goshen, Nova York303 contribuições
A hiking and mountain biking mecca.
set de 2016 • A sós
This place is mobbed in the summer. They have a public pool and many picnic areas.

I personally use it as a Harriman State Park hiking base. There are many trails and the back section has a mountain Biking trail. Plenty of parking and a few sights to enjoy.
Feita em 16 de janeiro de 2017
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

katrinangel2
Nova York, Nova York561 contribuições
Long or short hike, your choice
dez de 2016 • Família
I have only hiked here. I have never gone to this area in anything other than Winter. You can take a half day or a 3 hour hike with moderate activity. Just bring your provisions in case you get lost and end up on a longer hike. So beautiful in all weather.
Feita em 8 de janeiro de 2017
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

robcurtross
Nova York, Nova York14.583 contribuições
Great base for hiking and many other activities
jun de 2016 • Casais
The Anthony Wayne Recreation Area of Harriman State Park lies in a wooded valley. Facilities include picnic areas with fireplaces, playing fields and cross-country ski and hiking trails.

My favorite hike here is the West Mountain Loop, which we enjoyed last June.

From the kiosk at the southern end of the parking area, proceed south on the Horn Hill Loop Mountain Bike Trail, with blue-on-white diamond blazes. The trail passes through a pine forest and crosses several bridges. In about half a mile, you’ll cross the white-blazed Appalachian Trail, and soon afterwards, you’ll reach a junction with the red-on-white-blazed Ramapo-Dunderberg (R-D) Trail. Turn left onto the R-D Trail, which begins to climb West Mountain.

After ascending stone steps, the R-D Trail crosses the wide Beechy Bottom East Road, also marked with the blue-on-white blazes of the Horn Hill Bike Path. It continues to climb steadily through dense mountain laurel thickets until it bears left and crosses a gully. The trail now turns left, passes an old mine opening and continues around the side of the mountain. Soon, it turns sharply left, climbs steeply, then follows a level path alongside a cliff, with views to the left.

After passing a broad west-facing viewpoint, the trail bears right and continues to climb, soon reaching a panoramic viewpoint at a junction with the yellow-blazed Suffern-Bear Mountain (S-BM) Trail. You can see the Hudson River on the left and the hills of Harriman State Park ahead, with the New York City skyline visible in the distance on a clear day. You’ll want to take a break here to rest from the climb and enjoy the views.

When you’re ready to continue, proceed ahead on the joint R-D/S-BM Trail. In 300 feet, after climbing a ledge, the two trails diverge. Turn left and follow the yellow blazes of the S-BM Trail, which descends slightly and proceeds through a fire-scarred area. Although the fire took place a number of years ago, the forest is only now starting to regenerate, with some young pine trees growing in otherwise barren surroundings.

After descending to a valley and then climbing again, the S-BM Trail reaches a T-intersection where the blue-blazed Timp-Torne Trail joins from the left. Turn right, following the blue/yellow-blazed trail, which runs along ledges, with some views to the south.

In another 0.3 mile, after passing a viewpoint from a rock ledge to the right, you’ll come to a junction. Here, the yellow-blazed S-BM Trail continues ahead, but you should bear right, following the blue-blazed Timp-Torne Trail and sign pointing to a shelter. In 500 feet, you’ll arrive at the West Mountain Shelter, built in 1928, which offers spectacular views of the Hudson River to the southeast. This is a good place to stop for a break.

After you’ve rested for a while, retrace your steps back to the junction of the blue and yellow trails. Turn right at the junction, following the yellow-blazed S-BM Trail, which ascends slightly to reach an open area, with views of the Perkins Memorial Tower on Bear Mountain to the north. The trail now descends, first steeply, then more gradually through mountain laurel thickets. After reaching a valley at the base of the descent, it once again climbs steeply. In a level area at the top of the steep climb, there is a limited viewpoint to the southeast from a rock ledge to the right of the trail.

After climbing once more to reach the highest point on the ridge, the S-BM Trail begins a steady descent of about 750 vertical feet. It soon reaches a very steep section, where extreme care should be taken if the trail is wet, icy or snow-covered. The grade then moderates somewhat. About halfway down, the trail crosses a stream and joins an old woods road, with more gentle grades. The road is eroded in places, and some stretches of the trail have been routed away from the road.

At the base of the descent, follow the yellow-blazed S-BM Trail as it turns left onto a level road, the route of the Doodletown Bridle Path. When the yellow blazes go off to the right, continue ahead on the wide bridle path, now following the Fawn Trail, blazed with red-“F”-on-white blazes, which begins here. The trail soon begins a gradual climb. In about three-quarters of a mile, the Fawn Trail bears left, leaving the bridle path. Continue to follow the red-“F”-on-white blazes of the Fawn Trail.

The Fawn Trail climbs over a rise and descends to cross the white-blazed Appalachian Trail. After a short climb, the Fawn Trail crosses the blue-blazed Timp-Torne Trail and descends to end at a junction with the white-blazed Anthony Wayne Trail at Beechy Bottom East Road. Turn left and follow Beechy Bottom East Road as it heads south. Almost immediately, you’ll reach an intersection where the Horn Hill Loop Mountain Bike Trail joins from the right. Bear left and continue ahead on the bike trail, following the blue-on-white blazes along the nearly level Beechy Bottom East Road (do not follow the white blazes of the Anthony Wayne Trail, which turns right and descends to the northern parking area at the Anthony Wayne Recreation Area).

In about a third of a mile, you’ll come to a Y-intersection, where you should bear right. In 100 feet, you’ll reach a second Y-intersection. Here, the bike trail bears left, but you should take the right fork, which descends towards the Anthony Wayne Recreation Area. Continue ahead at a four-way intersection, but when you reach a T-intersection, turn left onto a grassy road which leads to a picnic area. Continue through the picnic area, then bear right and cross a stone-faced bridge over a stream, which leads to the northern end of the Far South Parking Area. Turn left and walk to the southern end of the parking area, where the hike began.
Feita em 9 de dezembro de 2016
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.

annews9
Merrick, Nova York357 contribuições
Nice October Fest
out de 2016 • A sós
This is a great area for hiking however I was surprised to find the October Fest here. There was a large tent area with plenty of tables and a great stage for the band. There was beer everywhere if you are a beer drinker however the food lines were very long: pretzel, hotdog or knockwurst and soda.Be aware there was a LARGE police prescence so if you go next year, don't drink and drive. The hiking was great, peak fall colors!!
Feita em 10 de novembro de 2016
Esta avaliação representa a opinião subjetiva de um membro do Tripadvisor, e não da TripAdvisor LLC.
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